American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Working Document

Index

Agriculture (updated 3/11/09) * Housing and Urban Development (updated 3/11/09) *
Commerce (updated 3/10/09) * Interior (updated 3/11/09) *
Defense (updated 3/6/09) Justice (updated 3/10/09) *
Education (updated 3/11/09) * Labor (updated 3/6/09)
Energy (updated 3/10/09) * National Endowment for the Arts (updated 3/6/09) *
EPA (updated 3/6/09) * National Science Foundation (updated 3/6/09)
Health and Human Services (updated 3/6/09) * Small Business Administration (updated 3.10.09)
National Institutes of Health (updated 3/11/09) * Veteran Affairs (updated 3/6/09)
Homeland Security (updated 3/6/09) Transportation (updated 3/6/09) *

*denotes active solicitations.

Agriculture

Active Solicitations


Implementing the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act). The $28B (3.5%) of the package was appropriated to USDA.

  • The Act provides $19.7 billion to increase the monthly amount of nutrition assistance to 31.8 million people.
  • Enables expanded opportunities for broadband loans and grants to rural communities.
  • Expands funding opportunities to develop water and waste facilities.
  • Provides funding to protect and conserve the nation's forests and farm land.

Information: http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/?navid=USDA_ARRA

Commerce

Active Solicitations


Economic Development Administration

The Recovery Act includes $150 million for EDA to provide grants to economically distressed areas across the Nation to generate private sector jobs. Priority consideration will be given to those areas that have experienced sudden and severe economic dislocation and job loss due to corporate restructuring. Funds will be disbursed through the agency.s traditional grant making process and will support efforts to create higher-skill, higher-wage jobs by promoting innovation and entrepreneurship and connecting regional economies with the worldwide marketplace.

National Telecommunications and Information Administration

The Recovery Act provides critical funding for programs at NTIA including:

  • $4.7 billion to establish a Broadband Technology Opportunities Program for awards to eligible entities to develop and expand broadband services to rural and underserved areas and improve access to broadband by public safety agencies.
    • Of these funds, $250 million will be available for innovative programs that encourage sustainable adoption of broadband services;
    • At least $200 million will be available to upgrade technology and capacity at public computing centers, including community colleges and public libraries;
    • $10 million will be a transfer to the Office of Inspector General for the purposes of BTOP audits and oversight.
    • Up to $350 million of the BTOP funding is designated for the development and maintenance of statewide broadband inventory maps.
  • $650 million for the TV Converter Box Coupon Program to allow NTIA to issue coupons to all households currently on the waiting list, to start mailing coupons via first class mail and to ensure vulnerable populations are prepared for the transition from analog-to-digital television transmission.

Office of Inspector General

  • The Recovery Act includes $6 million for the OIG to conduct audits and oversight of the programs and activities funded by the ARRA in addition to the $10 million provided to the OIG for oversight of the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program. With such a large infusion of cash expected to be obligated within a short time frame, this oversight will be important in evaluating the effectiveness of these programs and detecting and preventing waste, fraud and abuse.

NOAA

NOAA Receives $830 Million Through Recovery Act

The Department of Commerce's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will receive $830 million in funds as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The agency will use the funds, equivalent to 20 percent of NOAA.s 2008 budget, for projects that protect life and property and conserve and protect natural resources.

The act provides $230 million for habitat restoration, navigation projects, vessel maintenance, and other activities. An additional $430 million will be dedicated for construction and repair of NOAA facilities, ships and equipment, improvements for weather forecasting and satellite development. A total of $170 million will also be directed for climate modeling activities, including supercomputing procurement and research into climate change.

Department of Commerce agencies receiving one-time funds through the act are required to submit a plan to Congress with specifics on how allocations will be spent within 60 days of the legislation being enacted. Once completed, NOAA.s plan will be available to the public at the Department of Commerce and NOAA Web sites. Requests and applications for funding will be accepted when instructions and rules are posted for specific projects.

NIST

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act provides a total of $610 million in funding to NIST. The funding includes:

  • $220 million for NIST laboratory research, measurements, and other services supporting economic growth and U.S. innovation through funding of such items as competitive grants; research fellowships; and advanced measurement equipment and supplies;
  • $360 million to address NIST.s backlog of maintenance and renovation projects and for construction of new facilities and laboratories, including $180 million for a competitive construction grant program for funding research science buildings outside of NIST;
  • $20 million in funds transferred from the Department of Health and Human Services for standards-related research that supports the security and interoperability of electronic medical records to reduce health care costs and improve the quality of care; and
  • $10 million in funds transferred from the Department of Energy to help develop a comprehensive framework for a nationwide, fully interoperable smart grid for the U.S. electric power system.

Department of Commerce agencies receiving one-time funds through the Act are required to submit a plan to Congress with specifics on how allocations will be spent within 60 days of the legislation being enacted. Once completed, NIST.s plan will be available to the public, along with directions for applying for research fellowships, grants or construction funding at the Department of Commerce's and NIST Web sites.

Bureau of the Census

To ensure a successful 2010 Decennial Census, the Recovery Act includes $1 billion to hire new personnel for partnership and outreach efforts to minority communities and hard-to-reach populations, increase targeted media purchases, and ensure proper management of other operational and programmatic risks.

Defense

Distribution of Recovery Act funds:

  • $4.2 billion in Operation and Maintenance accounts to upgrade DoD facilities, including energy-related improvements
  • $1.3 billion in military construction for hospitals
  • $240 million in military construction for child development centers
  • $100 million in military construction for warrior transition complexes
  • $600 million for other military constructions projects such as housing for the troops and their families
  • $300 million to develop energy-efficient technologies
  • $120 million for the Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP)
  • $555 million for a temporary expansion of the Homeowner's Assistance Program (HAP) benefits for private home sale losses of both DoD military and civilian personnel
  • $15 million for DoD Inspector General oversight and audit of Recovery Act execution

Appropriations in this bill are available for obligation through the end of fiscal 2010, and through the end of fiscal 2013 for military construction.

The Recovery Act funding addresses some of the unique economic pressures faced by American service members because of their voluntary commitment to serve our nation. Specific investment in military construction will further President Obama's goal of providing stimulus to the economy while helping to improve the quality of life for our troops and their families. In addition to providing much needed facility improvements, this bill also provides more funding for our important energy research programs so that the DoD can continue to lead the way in the national effort to achieve greater energy independence.

DoD officials are working with the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force to quickly finalize details such as which bases will receive construction projects. We intend spending plans at the project level to be sent to Congress in the weeks ahead, with more announcements to be made as appropriate.

Education

Active Solicitations


*New 3.11.09* Timing of Available Funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

Overview of ARRA

The overall goals of the ARRA are to stimulate the economy in the short term and invest in education and other essential public services to ensure the long-term economic health of our nation. The success of the education part of the ARRA will depend on the shared commitment and responsibility of students, parents, teachers, principals, superintendents, education boards, college presidents, state school chiefs, governors, local officials, and federal officials. Collectively, we must advance ARRA.s short-term economic goals by investing quickly, and we must support ARRA.s long-term economic goals by investing wisely, using these funds to strengthen education, drive reforms, and improve results for students from early learning through college. Four principles guide the distribution and use of ARRA funds:

  1. Spend funds quickly to save and create jobs. ARRA funds will be distributed quickly to states, LEAs and other entities in order to avert layoffs and create jobs. States and LEAs in turn are urged to move rapidly to develop plans for using funds, consistent with the law's reporting and accountability requirements, and to promptly begin spending funds to help drive the nation's economic recovery.
  2. Improve student achievement through school improvement and reform. ARRA funds should be used to improve student achievement and help close the achievement gap. In addition, the SFSF requires progress on four reforms previously authorized under the bipartisan Elementary and Secondary Education Act and the America Competes Act of 2007:
    1. Making progress toward rigorous college- and career-ready standards and high-quality assessments that are valid and reliable for all students, including English language learners and students with disabilities;
    2. Establishing pre-K-to college and career data systems that track progress and foster continuous improvement;
    3. Making improvements in teacher effectiveness and in the equitable distribution of qualified teachers for all students, particularly students who are most in need;
    4. Providing intensive support and effective interventions for the lowest-performing schools.
  3. Ensure transparency, reporting and accountability. To prevent fraud and abuse, support the most effective uses of ARRA funds, and accurately measure and track results, recipients must publicly report on how funds are used. Due to the unprecedented scope and importance of this investment, ARRA funds are subject to additional and more rigorous reporting requirements than normally apply to grant recipients.
  4. Invest one-time ARRA funds thoughtfully to minimize the .funding cliff.. ARRA represents a historic infusion of funds that is expected to be temporary. Depending on the program, these funds are available for only two to three years. These funds should be invested in ways that do not result in unsustainable continuing commitments after the funding expires.

Categories of funds and schedule for distribution

Balancing the need for speedy investments and for rigorous accountability and transparency, the Department has designed the following approaches for distributing different categories of funds. Some funds will be distributed in stages to states on a formula basis and then distributed from states to local education agencies (LEAs) or institutions of higher education (IHEs) for use over the next two school years (2009.10 and 2010.11); some funds will be distributed all at once; some funds will be distributed through a competitive grant process.


The ARRA Pell grant and work study funding will be used for school year 2009.2010. These funds are available, pending disbursement, beginning July 1.

  • Pell Grants.$17.1 billion. This will increase the maximum Pell award for all eligible students from $4,850 to $5,350.
  • Work Study.$200 million.

The funds under the SFSF, Title I, Part A and IDEA, Part B will be available in two stages. Funds from these very large programs are to be delivered by formula from the Department to the states. The Department will release 50 percent of Title I, Part A and 50 percent of IDEA, Part B funds before the end of March 2009, without requiring new state applications. Streamlined, user-friendly applications for the initial 67 percent of the SFSF will be available to governors by the end of March, and funds will be made available by the Department within two weeks after receipt of an approvable application. For these three categories of funds, we expect to make available the remainder of the funds during the period July 1 to Sept. 30, 2009, conditioned on states providing additional information. The guidelines for securing these funds will be available on our Web site at www.ed.gov.

  • SFSF delivered to the state governors ($48.6 billion)
    • $39.8 billion is devoted to public early learning, K.12, and higher education. This amount must be distributed by formulae from the state to local education agencies and through a mechanism determined by the state to institutions of higher education.
    • $8.8 billion is allocated to governors for education (including school modernization), public safety, or other government services.
  • Title I, Part A ($10 billion) to State educational agencies.
  • IDEA, Part B ($11.7 billion) to State educational agencies.

A minimum of 50 percent of the funds for the following programs will also be available by the end of March as soon as guidelines are issued:

  • IDEA Part C ($500 million).
  • Vocational Rehabilitation State Grants ($540 million).

For the following programs under $500 million, all of the formula funds will be available by the end of March:

  • Impact Aid Construction ($100 million: only 40 percent will be distributed by formula; 60 percent will be distributed through competitive grants at a later date).
  • Independent Living Services ($140 million; only $52.5 million will be distributed by formula; remaining $87.5 will be distributed by competitive grants at a later date).
  • Education for Homeless Youth ($70 million).

For the following programs, funds will be made available beginning in fall 2009, and will be conditioned upon receipt of further information that will be outlined in future guidance:

  • Title I School Improvement Grants ($3 billion).
  • Educational Technology State Grants ($650 million).

The following funds will be made available beginning in fall 2009, based on the quality of the applications submitted through a competitive grant process. Guidelines for these funds will be posted shortly:

  • Teacher Incentive Fund ($200 million).
  • Teacher Quality Enhancement ($100 million).
  • Statewide Data Systems ($250 million).

Under the $5 billion in SFSF reserved for the Secretary of Education to make competitive grants, the Department will conduct a national competition among states for a $4.35 billion state incentive .Race to the Top. fund to improve education quality and results statewide. The Race to the Top fund will help states drive substantial gains in student achievement by supporting states making dramatic progress on the four reform goals described above and effectively using other ARRA funds. $650 million of the $5 billion will be set aside in the .Invest in What Works and Innovation. fund and be available through a competition to districts and non-profit groups with a strong track record of results. Guidelines and applications for the competitive funds will be posted expeditiously. Race to the Top grants will be made in two rounds-fall 2009 and spring 2010).


In the coming months, the Department will also announce opportunities to compete for discretionary funds under non-ARRA programs. The priorities for these competitions will be aligned with the reform goals of the Race to the Top fund, and will recognize states and LEAs that optimize the use of the varied funding streams provided under ARRA. In addition, the Department will identify technical assistance resources to help states and localities effectively implement the most promising and evidence-based reforms using all relevant federal, state, and local resources. With federal funds available for R&D, the Department also hopes to work with schools to support rigorous testing of interventions that states and districts support with ARRA funds, to build the knowledge base about what works.

What must states do to receive SFSF, Title I, Part A and IDEA, Part B funds?

States will receive initial Title I, Part A and IDEA, Part B funds under pre-existing applications. For the first round of state stabilization funds, governors must provide three things:

  • Assurances that they are advancing the four reforms described in the statute and maintenance of effort;
  • Baseline data on their current status in each of these areas; and
  • Basic information on how the funds will be used.

The Department intends to provide governors with a streamlined, user-friendly initial SFSF application package.


For the second round of funds, state educational agencies (SEAs) must provide information regarding their ability to meet reporting requirements under the ARRA under Title I, Part A and IDEA, Part B. In the case of the SFSF, governors must provide plans outlining the state's plans and progress in the four reform areas described above. As part of its application for the second part of the SFSF, a state must describe how the state and its LEAs plan to use SFSF and other funding in a fiscally prudent way that substantially improves teaching and learning. Governors and chief state school officers should work closely with other state and local officials in the state to develop effective data reporting systems and plans that will meet the assurances required by SFSF.

State Fiscal Stabilization Fund Grants

The State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (SFSF) program is a new one-time appropriation of $53.6 billion under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). Of the amount appropriated, the U. S. Department of Education will award governors approximately $48.6 billion by formula under the SFSF program in exchange for a commitment to advance essential education reforms to benefit students from early learning through post-secondary education, including: college- and career- ready standards and high-quality, valid and reliable assessments for all students; development and use of pre-K through post-secondary and career data systems; increasing teacher effectiveness and ensuring an equitable distribution of qualified teachers; and turning around the lowest-performing schools.


These funds will help stabilize state and local government budgets in order to minimize and avoid reductions in education and other essential public services. The program will help ensure that local educational agencies (LEAs) and publicly funded institutions of higher education (IHEs) have the resources to avert cuts and retain teachers and professors. The program may also help support the modernization, renovation, and repair of school and college facilities. In addition, the law provides governors with significant resources to support education (including school modernization renovation, and repair), public safety, and other government services. The Department will award the remaining $5 billion competitively under the .Race to the Top. and .Investing in What Works and Innovation. programs.


SFSF is a key element of the ARRA and is guided by the principles of ARRA.


In order to help alleviate the substantial budget shortfalls that states are facing, the Department has developed a streamlined, user-friendly process for expeditiously providing to states SFSF allocations:

  • Sixty-one percent of a state's allocations will be on the basis of their relative population of individuals aged 5 to 24, and 39 percent will be based on relative shares of total population.
  • The Department will award SFSF funds to governors in two phases. To receive its initial SFSF allocation, a state must submit to the Department an application that provides (1) assurances that the state is committed to advancing education reform in four specific areas (described below); (2) baseline data that
  • As part of its application for initial funding, the state must assure that it will take actions to: (a) increase teacher effectiveness and address inequities in the distribution of highly qualified teachers; (b) establish and use pre-K-through-college and career data systems to track progress and foster continuous improvement; (c) make progress toward rigorous college- and career-ready standards and high-quality assessments; and (d) support targeted, intensive support and effective interventions to turn around schools identified for corrective action and restructuring.
  • Within two weeks of receipt of an approvable SFSF application, the Department will provide a state with 67 percent of its SFSF allocation.
  • A state will receive the remaining portion of its SFSF allocation after the Department approves the state's plan detailing its strategies for addressing the education reform objectives described in the assurances. This plan must also describe how the state is implementing the record-keeping and reporting requirements under ARRA and how SFSF and other funding will be used in a fiscally prudent way that substantially improves teaching and learning.
  • In the near future, the Department will issue guidance on the specific requirements that a state must meet to receive its phase two allocation. The Department anticipates that the phase-two funds will be awarded beginning July 1, 2009, on a rolling basis.

If a state demonstrates that the amount of funds it will receive in phase one (67 percent of its total stabilization allocation) is insufficient to prevent the immediate layoff of personnel by LEAs, state educational agencies, or publicly funded institutions of higher education, the Department will award the state up to 90 percent of its SFSF allocation in phase one. In such cases, the remaining portion of the state's allocation will be provided after the Department approves the state's plan.


Of the amount appropriated for the SFSF, the Department will use at least $4.35 billion to make competitive grants under the .Race to the Top. fund. These grants will help states to drive significant improvement in student achievement, including through making progress toward the four assurances noted above.


The Department will use up to $650 million to make competitive awards under the .Invest in What Works and Innovation. fund. These awards will reward LEAs or nonprofit organizations that have made significant gains in closing achievement gaps to serve as models for best practices.


Funds to Restore Support for Education

  • States must use 81.8 percent of SFSF funds for the support of public elementary, secondary, and higher education, and, as applicable, early childhood education programs and services.
  • States must use their allocations to help restore for FY 2009, 2010, and 2011 support for public elementary, secondary, and postsecondary education to the greater of the FY 2008 or FY 2009 level. The funds needed to restore support for elementary and secondary education must be run through the state's primary elementary and secondary education funding formulae. The funds for higher education must go to IHEs.
  • If any SFSF funds remain after the state has restored state support for elementary and secondary education and higher education, the state must award the funds to LEAs on the basis of the relative Title I shares but not subject to Title I program requirements.

Funds to Support Public Safety and Other Government Services

  • States must use 18.2 percent of the SFSF funds for education (school modernization, renovation, and repair), public safety, and other government services. This may include assistance for early learning, elementary and secondary education, and IHEs. In addition, states may use these funds for modernization, renovation, or repair of public school and public or private college facilities.

LEA and IHE Uses of Funds

  • LEAs and IHEs should use funds consistent with the intent and overall goals of ARRA: to create and save jobs and to advance the education reforms set forth in the assurances section so as to produce lasting results for students from early learning to college. LEAs and IHEs are also encouraged to consider uses of funds that create lasting results without creating unsustainable recurring costs.
  • Subject to limited restrictions in ARRA as defined in further guidance LEAs may use their share of 81.8% of the SFSF education funds for any activity authorized under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) (which includes the modernization, renovation, or repair of public school facilities), the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (Adult Education Act), or the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Perkins Act).
  • Any funds that an LEA receives from the 81.8 percent of the SFSF program (whether distributed through the state's primary funding formulae or on the basis of the relative Title I, Part A) may be used for any activity listed in the above paragraph.
  • LEAs may use SFSF to pay salaries to avoid having to lay off teachers and other school employees.
  • To the extent LEAs use funds for modernization, renovation or repair, they should consider the use of facilities for early childhood education and for the community and should create .green. buildings.
  • Subject to limited restrictions in ARRA, IHEs may use program funds for: (1) education and general expenditures, and in such a way as to mitigate the need to raise tuition and fees for in-state students; or (2) the modernization, renovation, or repair of IHE facilities that are primarily used for instruction, research, or student housing. IHEs may not use funds to increase their endowments.

Fiscal Issues

  • The Department strongly encourages governors to award or otherwise commit program funds as soon as possible after receipt of their grant awards. However, funds are available for obligation at the state and local levels until Sept. 30, 2011.
  • As part of the state's application, each governor must include an assurance that the state will maintain the same level of support for elementary, secondary, and postsecondary education in FY 2009 through FY 2011 as it did in FY 2006. However, the statute authorizes the Department to waive this maintenance-of-effort requirement under certain conditions.
  • With prior approval from the secretary of education, a state or LEA may count program funds used for elementary or secondary education as non-federal funds to maintain fiscal effort under Department of Education programs that have maintenance-of-effort requirements.

Accountability Principles

  • The president and secretary are committed to spending ARRA dollars with an unprecedented level of transparency and accountability. Therefore, states and LEAs that receive SFSF should expect to report on how those funds were spent and the results of those expenditures. The administration will post reports on ARRA expenditures on the www.Recovery.gov Web site.
  • The SFSF authorization also contains specific reporting requirements to help ensure transparency and accountability for program funds. For example, states must report to the Department on, among other things: (1) the use of funds provided under the SFSF program; (2) the estimated number of jobs created or saved with program funds; (3) estimated tax increases that were averted as a result of program funds; and (4) the state's progress in the areas covered by the application assurances.
  • States must maintain records that will permit the Department to monitor, evaluate, and audit the SFSF effectively.

Awarding Title I, Part A Recovery Funds

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) provides significant new funding for programs under Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (Title I). Specifically, the ARRA provides $10 billion in additional fiscal year (FY) 2009 Title I, Part A funds to local education agencies (LEAs) for schools that have high concentrations of students from families that live in poverty in order to help improve teaching and learning for students most at risk of failing to meet state academic achievement standards. These funds create an unprecedented opportunity for educators to implement innovative strategies in Title I schools that improve education for at-risk students and close the achievement gaps while also stimulating the economy. The additional resources will enable LEAs to serve more students beyond the approximately 18 million currently served and boost the quality of teaching and learning.


Preliminary estimates of Title I, Part A recovery allocations to each state and LEA are available at: http://www.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/news.html#ARRA.


This document provides states and LEAs with basic information regarding how and when Title I, Part A recovery funds will be awarded by the U.S. Department of Education. In the coming weeks, the Department will provide more guidance regarding these funds, including how they should be used, the submission of waiver requests, and the reporting requirements. It also will provide information about Title I School Improvement grants, for which a $3 billion appropriation will be made available beginning fall 2009. Additional information and documents will be posted on www.ed.gov.


Title I, Part A recovery funds are a key element of the ARRA principles as described below.


Awarding Title I, Part A Recovery Funds

  • The Department plans to award 50 percent of each state's Title I, Part A recovery funds by the end of March 2009. These funds will be awarded under each state's existing approved Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) Consolidated State Application. No new or amended application will be required to receive this portion of the funds. However, in order to receive the remaining Title I, Part A recovery funds, a state must submit, for review and approval by the Department, an amendment to its Consolidated Application that addresses how it will meet the recordkeeping and reporting requirements of the ARRA.
  • The Title I, Part A ARRA awards will be in addition to the regular FY 2009 Title I, Part A grant awards that the Department plans to make on July 1 and Oct. 1, 2009. Together, these four grant awards (i.e., the two phases of the Title I, Part A recovery funds, and the two phases of the regular FY 2009 Title I, Part A funds) will constitute a state's total FY 2009 Title I, Part A allocation.
  • The fact that Title I, Part A recovery funds are FY 2009 funds does not preclude a state from awarding some or all of these funds to an LEA on the basis of existing, approved LEA applications.
  • In accordance with the goals of the ARRA, the Department encourages states to award Title I, Part A recovery funds to their LEAs as quickly as possible, consistent with prudent management, so that LEAs can begin using the funds. Similarly, an LEA should use its Title I, Part A recovery funds expeditiously but sensibly. Note that, in the absence of a waiver, an LEA must obligate at least 85 percent of its total FY 2009 Title I, Part A funds (including ARRA funds) by Sept. 30, 2010. Any remaining FY 2009 Title I, Part A funds will be available for obligation until Sept. 30, 2011.

LEA Eligibility for Title I, Part A Recovery Funds

  • An LEA is eligible to receive Title I, Part A recovery funds if it is eligible under the statutory eligibility criteria established in sections 1125(a)(1) and 1125A(c) of the ESEA for the Targeted and Education Finance Incentive Grant formulas of Title I, Part A.

Reservation of Title I, Part A Recovery Funds

  • A state must reserve 4 percent of its Title I, Part A recovery funds for school improvement activities under section 1003(a) of the ESEA. Of this 4 percent of funds, at least 95 percent must be allocated directly to LEAs for school improvement activities.
  • Except as noted above concerning the 4 percent reservation, a state would need a waiver to reserve any portion of its Title I, Part A recovery funds for state administration, because section 1004(b) of the ESEA limits the amount that a state may reserve for the administration of Title I. As it did last year, the Department will provide a table showing the base each state should use in determining the amount it may reserve for state administration.

Uses of Title I, Part A Recovery Funds

  • LEAs may use their Title I, Part A recovery funds consistent with the Title I, Part A statutory and regulatory requirements, including the requirements to provide equitable services to eligible private school students. Uses should be aligned with the core goals of ARRA to save and create jobs and to advance reforms.
  • Because the recovery funds constitute a large increase in Title I, Part A funding that will likely not be available at the same level beyond Sept. 30, 2011, schools and LEAs will have a unique opportunity to improve teaching and learning and should focus these funds on short-term investments with the potential for long-term benefits, rather than make ongoing commitments that they might not be able to sustain once recovery funds are expended.
  • Congress in its ARRA conference report indicated its intent that grantees use some of their Title 1 funds for early childhood programs and activities. The Administration is committed over the long term to expanding early childhood educational opportunities and creating a more seamless web of high-quality services for parents and children. In coming weeks, the Department will provide additional guidance on opportunities to use ARRA funds to expand high-quality early childhood educational services.
  • Examples of potential uses of the Title I, Part A recovery funds that are allowable under Title I and consistent with ARRA principles:
    • Establishing a system for identifying and training highly effective teachers to serve as instructional leaders in Title I schoolwide programs and modifying the school schedule to allow for collaboration among the instructional staff;
    • Establishing intensive, year-long teacher training for all teachers and the principal in a Title I elementary school in corrective action or restructuring status in order to train teachers to use a new reading curriculum that aggressively works on improving students. oral language skills and vocabulary or, in some other way, builds teachers. capacity to address academic achievement problems;
    • Strengthen and expand early childhood education by providing resources to align a district-wide Title I pre-K program with state early learning standards and state content standards for grades K.3 and, if there is a plan for sustainability beyond 2010.11, expanding high-quality Title I pre-K programs to larger numbers of young children;
    • Providing new opportunities for Title I schoolwide programs for secondary school students to use high-quality, online courseware as supplemental learning materials for meeting mathematics and science requirements;
    • Using longitudinal data systems to drive continuous improvement efforts focused on improving achievement in Title I schools;
    • Providing professional development to teachers in Title I targeted assistance programs on the use of data to inform and improve instruction for Title I-eligible students;
    • Using reading or mathematics coaches to provide professional development to teachers in Title I targeted assistance programs; and
    • Establishing or expanding fiscally sustainable extended learning opportunities for Title I-eligible students in targeted assistance programs, including activities provided before school, after school, during the summer, or over an extended school year.

Invitation for Waivers

  • The secretary of education will consider a request for a waiver with regard to the use of ARRA Title I funds:
    • of one or more of the "set-aside" requirements in Title I, Part A that apply to the use of funds by LEAs;
    • to calculate the per-pupil amount (PPA) for supplemental educational services (SES) based on an LEA's FY 2009 Title I, Part A allocation without regard to some or all of the recovery funds;
    • to allow a state to grant its LEAs a waiver of the carryover limitation in section 1127 of Title I, Part A more than once every three years; or
    • of the Title I, Part A maintenance-of-effort requirement (see below).
    • The secretary intends to issue regulations to allow reasonable adjustments to the limitation on state administration expenditures to help states defray the costs of ARRA data collection requirements.

Fiscal Issues

  • Maintenance of effort: With prior approval from the secretary of education, a state or LEA may count expenditures of SFSF used for elementary or secondary education as non-federal funds for purposes of determining whether the state or LEA has met the Title I, Part A maintenance of effort requirement. This may reduce the incidence of LEAs failing to maintain fiscal effort and the need to seek a waiver from the Department.
  • Supplement, not supplant: the Department may not waive the Title I, Part A .supplement, not supplant. requirement. Note, however, that in certain circumstances, including cases of severe budget shortfalls, an LEA may be able to establish compliance with the .supplement, not supplant. requirement, even if it uses Title I, Part A funds to pay for allowable costs that were previously paid for with state or local funds. (For additional information, see Title I Fiscal Issues Non-Regulatory Guidance, available at: http://www.ed.gov/programs/titleiparta/fiscalguid.pdf.)
  • Comparability: the Department may not waive the Title I, Part A comparability requirement.

Accountability Principles

  • Each state and LEA is responsible for ensuring that Title I recovery funds are used prudently and in accordance with the law.
  • Each LEA receiving Title 1 Part A recovery funds shall shall report a school-by-school listing of per-pupil educational expenditures from state and local sources. Further information will be provided in forthcoming department guidance.
  • The President and the Secretary are committed to ensuring that ARRA dollars are spent with an unprecedented level of transparency and accountability. Therefore, each state and LEA that receives Title I, Part A recovery funds must report on how those funds were spent at www.recovery.gov.

IDEA Recovery Funds for Services to Children and Youths with Disabilities

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) appropriates significant new funding for programs under Parts B and C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Part B of the IDEA provides funds to state educational agencies (SEAs) and local educational agencies (LEAs) to help them ensure that children with disabilities, including children aged three through five, have access to a free appropriate public education to meet each child's unique needs and prepare him or her for further education, employment, and independent living.


The IDEA recovery funds under ARRA will provide an unprecedented opportunity for states, LEAs, and early intervention service providers to implement innovative strategies to improve outcomes for infants, toddlers, children, and youths with disabilities while stimulating the economy. Under the ARRA, the IDEA recovery funds are provided under three authorities: $11.3 billion is available under Part B Grants to States; $400 million is available under Part B Preschool Grants; and $500 million is available under Part C Grants for Infants and Families. Preliminary information about each state's allocation is available at: http://www.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/Statetables/recovery.html. This Web site alsprovides information about the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (SFSF) under the ARRA, which is separate from the IDEA recovery funds described in this fact sheet. This document focuses on Part B; additional information on Part C will be available shortly.


IDEA, Part B recovery funds are a key element of the ARRA principles as described below:


Awarding IDEA Part B Grants to States and Preschool Grants Recovery Funds

  • The Department of Education plans to award 50 percent of the IDEA, Part B Grants to States and Preschool Grants recovery funds to SEAs by the end of March 2009. The other 50 percent will be awarded by Oct. 1, 2009. These awards will be in addition to the regular Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Part B Grants to States and Preschool Grants awards that will be made on July 1 (Grants to States and Preschool Grants) and Oct. 1, 2009 (Grants to States only). Together, these grant awards will constitute a state's total FY 2009 Part B Grants to States and Preschool Grants allocations.
  • A state does not need to submit a new application to receive the first 50 percent of the Part B Grants to States and Preschool Grants recovery funds because these funds will be made available to each state based on the state's eligibility established for FY 2008 Part B funds. The assurances in the state's FY 2008 application will apply to these recovery funds. In order to receive the remaining 50 percent of IDEA, Part B recovery funds, a state must
  • The additional IDEA funds provided under the ARRA do not increase the amount a state would otherwise be able to reserve for state administration or other state-level activities under its regular grants to states FY 2009 award.
  • LEA eligibility for the first 50 percent of the IDEA recovery funds is based on eligibility established by the LEA for FY 2008 funds.
  • In accordance with the goals of the ARRA, a state should obligate IDEA recovery funds to LEAs expeditiously. A state should make the Part B Grants to States and Preschool Grants recovery funds that it receives in March available to LEAs by the end of April 2009.
  • Similarly, an LEA should use the IDEA recovery funds expeditiously. An LEA should obligate the majority of these funds during school years 2008.09 and 2009.10 and the remainder during school year 2010.11. States may begin obligating IDEA, Part B recovery funds immediately upon the effective date of the grant. All IDEA recovery funds must be obligated by Sept. 30, 2011.

Uses of IDEA, Part B Recovery Funds

All IDEA recovery funds must be used consistently with the current IDEA, Part B statutory and regulatory requirements and applicable requirements in the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA) and the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR). An LEA must use IDEA recovery funds only for the excess costs of providing special education and related services to children with disabilities, except where IDEA specifically provides otherwise.


  • The IDEA recovery funds constitute a large one-time increment in IDEA, Part B funding that offers states and LEAs a unique opportunity to improve teaching and learning and results for children with disabilities. Generally, funds should be used for short-term investments that have the potential for long-term benefits, rather than for expenditures the LEAs may not be able to sustain once the recovery funds are expended. Some possible uses of these limited-term IDEA recovery funds that are allowable under IDEA and aligned with the core reform goals for which states must provide assurances under SFSF include:
    • Obtain state-of-the art assistive technology devices and provide training in their use to enhance access to the general curriculum for students with disabilities.
    • Provide intensive district-wide professional development for special education and regular education teachers that focuses on scaling-up, through replication, proven and innovative evidence-based school-wide strategies in reading, math, writing and science, and positive behavioral supports to improve outcomes for students with disabilities.
    • Develop or expand the capacity to collect and use data to improve teaching and learning.
    • Expand the availability and range of inclusive placement options for preschoolers with disabilities by developing the capacity of public and private preschool programs to serve these children.
    • Hire transition coordinators to work with employers in the community to develop job placements for youths with disabilities.

Invitation for Waivers

  • The Secretary intends to issue regulations to allow reasonable adjustments to the limitation on state administration expenditures to help states defray the costs of ARRA data collection requirements.

IDEA, Part B Fiscal Issues

  • An LEA may be able to reduce the level of state and local expenditures otherwise required by the IDEA LEA maintenance of effort (MOE) requirements. Generally, under section 613(a)(2)(C), in any fiscal year that an LEA's IDEA allocation exceeds the amount the LEA received in the previous year, under certain circumstances, the LEA may reduce the level of state and local expenditures by up to 50 percent of the amount of the increase, as long as the LEA uses those freed-up local funds for activities that could be supported under the ESEA. If an LEA takes advantage of this provision, the required MOE for future years is reduced consistent with the reduction it took, unless the LEA increases the amount of its state and local expenditures on its own. SEAs should encourage LEAs that can and do take advantage of this flexibility to focus the freed-up local funds on one-time expenditures that will help the state make progress on the goals in the SFSF program, such as improving the equitable distribution of effective teachers and the quality of assessments. SEAs will be expected to collect and report information on the use of the freed-up funds.
  • Alternatively, an LEA may (or in some cases must) use up to 15 percent of its total IDEA, Part B Grants to States and Preschool Grants for early intervention services for children in grades K through 12 who are not currently identified as children with disabilities, but who need additional academic and behavioral support to succeed in a general education environment. However, an LEA may use only up to 15 percent of its allocation minus any amount (on a dollar-for-dollar basis) by which the LEA reduced its required state and local expenditures under section 613(a)(2)(C).
  • State-level MOE may be waived under Part B of the IDEA by the Secretary of Education on a state-by-state basis, for a single year at a time, for exceptional or uncontrollable circumstances, such as a natural disaster or a precipitous and unforeseen decline in the financial resources of a state. LEA-level MOE may not be waived.
  • With prior approval from the Secretary of Education, a state or LEA may count SFSF (but not IDEA recovery funds) under the ARRA that are used for special education and related services as non-federal funds for purposes of determining whether the state or LEA has met the IDEA, Part B MOE requirements. (See separate fact sheet on SFSF for more information.)

Accountability Principles

As with all federal funds, states and LEAs are responsible for ensuring that the IDEA, Part B recovery funds are used prudently and in accordance with the law.

  • ARRA requires that recipients of funds made available under that act separately account for, and report on, how those funds are spent and the results of those expenditures
  • The President and the Secretary are committed to ensuring that ARRA dollars are spent with an unprecedented level of transparency and accountability. The administration will post reports on ARRA expenditures on the Recovery.gov Web site.

Energy

Active Solicitations

In response to the Recovery Act, the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory intends to issue, on behalf of the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, four (4) Funding Opportunity Announcements for improving techniques to clean or capture and store the emissions from coal-fired power plants and other industrial sources (e.g., cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, etc.). The areas of interest include:

Funding Overview

Energy efficient homes and businesses: Funding provided through the states for homeowners and businesses to take immediate steps toward energy efficiency . reducing heating and air conditioning bills and creating jobs. $5 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act


Greening federal buildings: Provide funding to improve the efficiency of federal government offices and buildings, reducing energy bills and creating jobs. $4.5 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

Renewable energy projects: Accelerate the construction of solar, wind, geothermal and other renewable energy generation facilities through a combination of loans and grants, creating jobs immediately and providing the United States with a clean energy supply for the future. $2.5 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act


Smart Grid technology and transmission infrastructure: Build the transmission lines and grid technology infrastructure needed for a better, smarter grid to transport electricity . from the places renewable energy can be produced to the places it will be used. $4.5 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act


Clean fossil energy technology: Develop innovative technologies for clean coal, petroleum coke and other plants of the future, allowing our nation to safely use our abundant coal and fossil energy resources. $3.4 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act


Next generation biofuels: Provide grants to accelerate the research and deployment of cellulosic biofuels technologies to provide a clean alternative to imported oil. $800 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act


Science and basic research in the energy technologies of the future: Investments in building and renovating laboratories and research facilities to create jobs immediately and enable the research that will sustain American industry and provide new energy and climate solutions. $1.6 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act


Battery research and advanced vehicle technologies: Loans and grants to support the development of advanced vehicle batteries and battery systems to reinvigorate the U.S. auto industry, reduce the U.S. dependence on foreign oil, and transform the way automobiles are powered. $2 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act


Advanced Research Project Agency-Energy (ARPA-E): Jump start advanced energy technologies by funding high-risk, high-payoff research in collaboration with industry. $400 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act


Cleanup of nuclear legacy: Redouble the ongoing efforts to clean up radioactive waste from Cold War nuclear project sites, creating jobs and reclaiming lands for communities across the country. $6 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

Notice of Intent to Issue Funding Opportunity Announcement No. DE-FOA-0000036 entitled "Smart Grid Demonstrations"

On March 2, 2009 the Department of Energy released a Notice of Intent to issue a Funding Opportunities Announcement for Regional Smart Grid Demonstrations.


In support of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) intends to issue, on behalf of the DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) entitled .Smart Grid Demonstrations.. The subject FOA will include three topical areas of interest: Regional Smart Grid Demonstrations, Utility-Scale Energy Storage Demonstrations, and Regional Synchrophasor Demonstrations.

Environmental Protection Agency

Active Solicitations


On March 3, 2009, EPA reported that it has:

  • begun to administer the $7.22 billion in AARA funding allocated to support projects and programs administered by the Agency. To date, OMB has authorized $6.24 billion of this amount.
  • established a senior-level management and oversight structure to assure that all issues related to the stimulus are addressed, deadlines are met and systems are in place to award, monitor and track ARRA money entrusted to the Agency.
  • begun preparation of an Agency emergency Information Collection Request (ICR) . a necessary paperwork reduction requirement which must be met before we can award grants.
  • under the Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Fund programs,
  • under the Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) program,
    • notified 50 states and the District of Columbia of the availability of DERA funds through a Notice of Intent to Apply. (States must reply by March 6th their acceptance of ARRA DERA State Program Funds - a step required by Energy Policy Act [EPAct] of 2005). If all states apply, each state and the District of Columbia will receive a minimum of $1.7M through the state program.
    • presented ARRA DERA program information to a number of stakeholder groups, including the Mobile Source Technical Review subcommittee of Clean Air Act Advisory Committee, National Association of Clean Air Agencies Your browser may not support display of this image.membership, SmartWay Transport partners, tribes and others.
  • under the Brownfields program, developed a draft plan for implementation as well as draft grant recipient terms and conditions which ensure accountability.
  • under the leaking underground storage tank program, developed a draft allocation plan for stimulus funds as well as draft implementation guidance and measures to ensure accountability.
  • under the Superfund program, developed a draft implementation plan.

Health and Human Services

Active Solicitations

  • See NIH below

Some $59 billion of Recovery Act funds are being invested in improving health and human services. These investments include:

  • Scientific Research & Facilities: Support for the construction of new research and educational facilities as well as groundbreaking scientific research that will improve the health of the nation.
  • Community Services and Early Childhood Care and Education Programs: Critical funding for programs such as community services infrastructure, meals for the elderly and persons with disabilities, Head Start, and subsidized child care to support children and families through the lifecycle.
  • Community Health: Support for the renovation and improvement of community health centers and other programs that serve patients in communities across the country.
  • Health IT: Funding to modernize the health care system by catalyzing the adoption of health information technology by 2014. Achieving this goal will reduce health costs for the federal government by over $12 billion over 10 years.

President Obama today also announced the release of $155 million authorized by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act that will support 126 new health centers. These health centers will help people in need . many with no health insurance . obtain access to comprehensive primary and preventive health care services.


"We have acted quickly to put Recovery Act dollars to good use in communities across America," said President Obama. "The construction and expansion of health centers will create thousands of new jobs, help provide health care to an estimated 750,000 Americans across the country who wouldn.t have access to care without these centers, and take another step toward an affordable, accessible health care system."


The grants, which are administered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), are expected to create 5,500 jobs at the new health centers.

National Institutes of Health


Active Solicitations

Notices

The Recovery Act provides a total of $10.4 billion to NIH, all available for two years.through September 2010. NIH expects to spend as much as possible in FY 2009. Below is a summary:

  • $8.2 billion in support of scientific research priorities
    • $7.4 billion is transferred to the Institutes and Centers and Common Fund (CF), based on a percentage-based formula
    • $800 million to the Office of the Director (OD) (not including CF)
      (For example, support for
      Challenge Grants), a program designed to focus on health and science problems where progress can be expected in two years.
    • To support additional scientific research-related activities that also align with the overall purposes of the Act
  • $1 billion to support Extramural Construction, Repairs, and Alterations
    • Allocated to the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) in support of all NIH funded research institutions
  • $300 million Shared Instrumentation and other capital equipment
    • Allocated to NCRR to support all NIH activities
  • $500 million for NIH buildings and facilities
    • To fund high priority repair, construction and improvement projects on NIH campuses that also align with the overall purpose of the Act
    • $400 million for Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER)

Many types of funding mechanisms will be supported, but, in general, NIH will focus scientific activities in several areas:

  1. They will choose among recently peer reviewed, highly meritorious R01 and similar mechanisms capable of making significant advances with a two-year grant. R01 are projects proposed directly from scientists across the country. They will also fund new R01 applications that have a reasonable expectation of making progress in a two-year grant.
  2. They will accelerate the tempo of ongoing science through targeted supplements to current grants. For example, they may competitively expand the scope of current research awards or supplement an existing award with additional support for infrastructure (e.g., equipment) that will be used in the two-year availability of these funds.
  3. NIH anticipates supporting new types of activities that fit into the structure of the Recovery Act. It will support a reasonable number of awards to jump start the new NIH Challenge Grant program. This program is designed to focus on health and science problems where progress can be expected in two years. The number of awards and amount of funds will be determined, based on the scientific merit and the quality of applications.
  4. NIH will also use other funding mechanisms, as appropriate.

The Process

NIH is working closely with the HHS Recovery Act Implementation team to ensure transparency and accountability for their Recovery Act funds. As NIH Spend Plans are approved through this process, NIH will post information about these critical projects and their impact on the economy on www.hhs.gov/recovery.


The impact is expected to extend beyond the immediate scientists who will receive funds, to allied health workers, technicians, students, trade workers and others who will receive the leveraged benefits. We understand to accomplish the goals of the Recovery and Reinvestment Act, it will take the help of the entire scientific community. Beyond the immediate economic stimulus, the long-term impact from the science funded by the Recovery Act will have a positive impact upon the health of the nation for years to come.

Homeland Security

St. Elizabeths/DHS Headquarters Consolidation:

  • $650 million ($200 million to DHS; $450 million to GSA)

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP):

  • $720 million for construction at land ports of entry ($300 million GSA; $420 million CBP)
  • $100 million for Non-Intrusive Inspection (NII) technology
  • $100 million for border technology on the southwest border
  • $60 million for tactical communications equipment and radios

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE):

  • $20 million for ICE automation modernization and tactical communications

Transportation Security Administration:

  • $1 billion for explosives detection systems and checkpoint screening equipment

U.S. Coast Guard:

  • $142 million for Alteration of Bridges program
  • $98 million for construction, which may include the following:
    • Shore facilities and aids to navigation facilities
    • Vessel repair/acquisition (includes High Endurance Cutter, National Security Cutter)

Federal Emergency Management Agency:

  • $100 million for Emergency Food and Shelter Program
  • $150 million for transit and rail security grants
  • $150 million for port security grants, no non-federal match required
  • $210 million for Assistance to Firefighter (AFG) grants for firehouse construction; maximum grant is $15.0M
  • $5 million expansion in authority for FEMA Community Disaster Loans
  • Requires the establishment of an arbitration panel to resolve Katrina/Rita public assistance disputes
  • Requires FEMA to accept additional applications for Katrina/Rita public assistance
  • All non-federal matching requirements for SAFER grants waived for FY 2009-2010
FEMA:
- Will issue grant guidance June/July 2009
- Receipt and review of grant applications July/August 2009
- Grants will be awarded September/December 2009
- Emergency Food & Shelter:
- Complete Congressional notifications of award 3/31/09
- Issue funding document to National Board 3/31/09

DHS Office of Inspector General:

  • $5 million to conduct related oversight and audits

HUD

Active Solicitations


HUD Implementation of the Recovery Act

The Recovery Act includes $13.61 billion for projects and programs administered by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, nearly 75 percent of which was allocated to state and local recipients on February 25, 2009 . only eight days after President Obama signed the Act into law. Recovery Act investments in HUD programs will be not just swift, but also effective: they will generate tens of thousands of jobs, modernize homes to make them energy efficient, and help the families and communities hardest hit by the economic crisis. The remaining 25 percent of funds will be awarded via competition in the coming months. Additional guidance on the implementation of all funds will be routinely provided on this website.


Promoting Energy Efficiency and Creating Green Jobs

These investments are powerful vehicles for economic recovery because they work quickly, are labor-intensive, create jobs where they are needed most, and lead to lasting neighborhood benefits. Many will also reduce greenhouse gas emissions and save Americans money by retrofitting housing to make it more energy efficient.

  • Public Housing Capital Fund: $4 billion invested in energy efficient modernization and renovation of our nation's critical public housing inventory.
  • Native American Housing Block Grants: $510 million invested in energy efficient modernization and renovation of housing maintained by Native American housing programs, and the development of sustainable communities.
  • Assisted Housing Energy Retrofit: $250 million invested in energy efficient modernization and renovation of housing of HUD-sponsored housing for low-income, elderly, and disabled persons.
  • Lead Hazard Reduction: $100 million invested in lead based paint hazard reduction and abatement activities.

Supporting Shovel-Ready Projects and Assisted Housing Improvements

These investments will support a broad range of housing and community development projects that are ready to go. Many of these projects have been held up for lack of private investment due to fallout from the broader economic crisis and credit crunch.

  • Tax Credit Assistance Program: $2.25 billion invested in a special allocation of HOME funds to accelerate the production and preservation of tens of thousands of units of affordable housing.
  • Community Development Block Grants: $1 billion for approximately 1,200 state and local governments to invest in their own community development priorities. Most local governments use this investment to rehabilitate affordable housing and improve key public facilities . stabilizing communities and creating jobs locally.
  • Project-Based Rental Assistance: $2 billion invested in full 12-month funding for Section 8 project-based housing contracts. This funding will enable owners to undertake much-needed project improvements to maintain the quality of this critical affordable housing.

Promoting Stable Communities and Helping Families Hardest Hit by the Economic Crisis

These investments will help communities and families that have experienced the brunt of the economic downturn. Resources will be used to stabilize and revive local neighborhoods and housing markets with heavy concentrations of foreclosed properties. Funds will also assist the vulnerable families and individuals who are on the brink of homelessness or have recently become homeless.

  • Neighborhood Stabilization Program: $2 billion invested in mitigating the impact of foreclosures through the purchase and rehabilitation of foreclosed, vacant properties in order to create more affordable housing and renew neighborhoods devastated by the economic crisis.
  • Homelessness Prevention: $1.5 billion invested in preventing homelessness and enabling the rapid re-housing of homeless families and individuals, helping them reenter the labor market more quickly and preventing the further destabilization of neighborhoods.

Interior

Active Solicitations


The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 will provide $1 billion to the Bureau of Reclamation, which provides water supplies and produces hydropower in the West. Funds are specifically identified in the Act to fund water reuse projects and construct rural water projects that will provide clean, reliable drinking water to rural areas and ensure adequate water supplies to western localities. Funds are also expected to be used to promote water conservation, improve energy efficiency, address aging water infrastructure, and meet endangered species requirements through improvements such as fish screens and fish passage projects.


$750 million will be used by the National Park Service to preserve and protect national icons and historic landscapes, improve energy efficiency and renewable energy use at park units throughout the nation, remediate abandoned mines sites on park units, and provide historic preservation funding to protect and restore buildings at historically black colleges. Funding under the Federal Highway Administration will improve park roads for more than 275 million visitors. NPS also will repair the seawall adjacent to the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C. to protect the memorial from the effects of settlement.


$500 million for the Bureau of Indian Affairs will be used to replace and upgrade Indian schools that will benefit the 47,000 Indian children that are educated in these schools. These projects will provide access for the disabled, replace inefficient heating and cooling systems, and create a better learning environment. BIA will provide $130 to 170 million in loans to spur Indian economies where unemployment far exceeds the national average. BIA will initiate several on-the-job training efforts in the construction trades to train tribal members to become certified plumbers and pipefitters. The initiative will be done in partnership with the Council on Tribal Employment Rights and the Laborers-Employers Cooperation and Education Trust. BIA also will expand a pilot project in partnership with the United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters.


$280 million for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will improve energy efficiency and renewable use at refuges, resulting in the "greening" of facilities throughout the nation. Funding also will be used to restore wetlands, riparian habitat, endangered species habitat, and other important landscapes. FWS also will restore facilities that are key to the management and restoration of wildlife and fisheries.


$320 million for the Bureau of Land Management will be used to remediate abandoned mines, which will allow increased access to public lands. Funding will help expand BLM's capacity to authorize renewable energy development on public lands while ensuring environmental protection of these areas and restoration of native plants and animals, including sage grouse habitat. Funding is also included for Interior agencies to eliminate underbrush and other vegetation in fire-prone areas to reduce the threat and potential severity of fire.


$140 million will be used by the U.S. Geological Survey to restore and rehabilitate laboratories and research facilities and improve their energy efficiency and renewable use. Funds will help modernize streamgages that are critical for monitoring streamflow and providing information that is used extensively by water managers and the public. For example, important wildlife research facilities at Patuxent Wildlife and Research Refuge will be upgraded and two 50-year old vessels on the Great Lakes used for inventory and monitoring of lake trout and other important fisheries will be replaced.

Justice

Active Solicitations


OJP- The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 will provide $2.7 billion to the Office of Justice Programs (OJP), which provides federal leadership in developing the nation's capacity to prevent and control crime, administering justice, and assisting victims. Specifically, the Act provides $2 billion for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Program to support a broad range of activities to prevent and control crime and improve the criminal justice system, from law enforcement and prosecution, to courts and corrections, to drug treatment, to victim assistance. Another $225 million in Edward Byrne Competitive Grant Program funding is available to help communities address targeted needs. OJP also will administer an additional $225 million for assistance to tribal law enforcement, $125 million for rural law enforcement to prevent and combat drug-related crime, $30 million for law enforcement along the Southern Border and in High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas, $50 million for Internet Crimes Against Children initiatives, and $100 million for victim compensation and assistance. OJP is committed to working with our national, state, local and tribal partnerships to ensure this funding invests in the American workforce.

COPS - The Act will provide $1 billion under the
COPS Hiring Recovery Program (CHRP) in grant funding for the hiring and rehiring of additional career law enforcement officers. CHRP grants will provide 100 percent funding for approved entry-level salaries and benefits for 3 years (36 months) for newly-hired, full-time sworn officer positions (including filling existing unfunded vacancies) or for rehired officers who have been laid off, or are scheduled to be laid off on a future date, as a result of local budget cuts. In addition, there is no cap on the number of positions an agency may request, but awards will be limited to available funding.

OVW - $225 million will be used by the
Office on Violence Against Women to develop and support the capacity of state, local, tribal, and non-profit entities involved in responding to violence against women. The Act directs $175 million to support the work of states, tribal governments, state domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions, and tribal domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions. The majority of these funds will be awarded to states, allocated based on population, under the Services Training Officers Prosecutors (STOP) Formula Grant Program to promote a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach to enhance services and advocacy to victims, improve the criminal justice system's response, and promote effective law enforcement and prosecution strategies to address domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. The remaining funds will be awarded to state coalitions, tribal governments, and tribal coalitions based on statutory set-asides from STOP funds. The Transitional Housing Assistance Grant Program will administer $50 million in grants focusing on a holistic, victim-centered approach to transitional housing services and related support services that move individuals into permanent housing.

ATF - $10 million will go toward the
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Project Gunrunner for the Southwest Border Initiative. The Administration's Southwest Border Initiative will reduce cross border drug and weapons trafficking, and the associated high level of violence occurring on the border between the U.S. and Mexico. The primary role of ATF's Project Gunrunner in support of this initiative is to stem the illegal trafficking of firearms across the border and to reduce the firearms violence occurring on both sides of the border.

Labor

  • Workforce Investment Act (WIA) programs: Provides $3,950,000,000 for WIA programs, including:
    • Adult Employment and Training Activities: $500,000,000 is provided for programs described at http://www.doleta.gov/programs/general_info.cfm. Priority use of funds is for services to public assistance recipients and other low income individuals.
    • Youth Activities, including summer jobs for youth: $1,200,000,000 is provided for programs described at http://www.doleta.gov/youth_services/. Particular emphasis is placed on creating summer employment opportunities for youth, but year-round youth activities are also envisioned. Age eligibility for youth services with these funds is raised from 21 to 24.
    • Dislocated Worker Employment and Training Activities: $1,250,000,000 is provided for formula funded programs described at http://www.doleta.gov/programs/ETA_default.cfm?#. Dislocated An additional $200,000,000 is provided for National Emergency Grants to respond to plant closings, mass layoffs and other worker dislocations, as described at http://www.doleta.gov/NEG/definition.cfm.
    • Program of Competitive Grants for Worker Training and Placement in High Growth and Emerging Industry Sectors: $750,000,000 is provided for a program of competitive grants for worker training and placement in high growth and emerging industry sectors. Of the total, $500,000,000 is to be used for research, labor exchange, and job training projects that prepare workers for careers in energy efficiency and renewable industry industries. In awarding remaining funds, priority shall be given to projects that prepare workers for careers in the health care sector.
    • YouthBuild Activities: $50,000,000 is provided for the program described at http://www.doleta.gov/youth_services/.
  • Community Service Employment for Older Americans: $120,000,000 is provided for part-time employment opportunities for low income seniors, as described at http://www.doleta.gov/seniors/.
  • Employment Service Grants to States: $400,000,000 is provided for services described at http://www.doleta.gov/programs/Wagner_Peyser.cfm. Of this total, $250,000,000 is to be used for reemployment services to connect unemployment insurance claimants to employment and training opportunities that will facilitate their reentry into employment.
  • Unemployment Insurance (UI):
    • EUC Extension: The Emergency Unemployment Compensation Act of 2008 (EUC) which would have expired on March 31, 2009 is extended through December 31, 2009. The EUC program is described at http://www.workforcesecurity.doleta.gov/unemploy/supp_act.asp.
    • Increased UI Benefits: Benefit payments are increased by $25 per week through December 31, 2009 for individuals receiving Trade Readjustment Allowances, Disaster Unemployment Benefits, regular Unemployment Compensation, Extended Benefits, or EUC. The programs are described through links at http://www.workforcesecurity.doleta.gov/unemploy/.
    • Special Transfers for Unemployment Compensation Modernization: Up to $7 billion is transferred from the Federal Unemployment Account to the state accounts as .incentive payments. to encourage states to enact specific reforms, such as coverage of part-time workers. Incentive payments expire October 1, 2011.
    • Increased UI Administrative Funding: An additional $500,000,000 is provided to states to administer their UI programs.
    • Temporary Suspension of Taxation of Unemployment Benefits: Federal income tax on the first $2,400 of unemployment benefits is suspended for 2009.
    • Full Federal Funding of Unemployment Compensation for a Limited Period: Extended Benefits would be 100% federally financed through January 1, 2010. Extended benefits are described at http://www.workforcesecurity.doleta.gov/unemploy/extenben.asp.
    • Temporary Assistance for States with UI Funding Advances: Interest payments and accrual of interest on loans received by State unemployment trust funds are waived through December 31, 2010.
  • Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC): A new targeted group is created for WOTC, which provides a tax credit to employers who hire members of targeted groups. The new group is unemployed veterans and disconnected youth who begin work in 2009 and 2010. The credit applies to individuals who begin work for the employer after December 31, 2008. WOTC is described at http://www.doleta.gov/business/incentives/opptax/.
  • Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA): All TAA programs are reauthorized through Dec. 31, 2010. Current Trade Adjustment Assistance is expanded to trade-affected services sector workers and workers affected by offshoring or outsourcing to all countries, including China or India. Training funds available to states are increased by 160%, to $575 million a year, and a new TAA program is created for trade-affected communities. In addition, the reauthorization allows for automatic TAA eligibility for workers suffering from import surges and subject to unfair trade determinations, makes training, healthcare and re-employment TAA benefits more accessible and flexible, and enhances benefits in the TAA for Firms and TAA for Farmers programs. The current TAA program (before reauthorization) is described at http://www.doleta.gov/tradeact/taa/WhoWeServe.cfm.
  • COBRA Continuation Coverage: Provides funding for a 65% reduction in COBRA premiums for eligible individuals.

National Endowment for the Arts

Active Solicitations

Implementation Plans

In accordance with Section 2.7 of the Office of Management and Budget's Initial Implementation Guidance for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (M-09-10), the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) implementation plan is as follows:

  1. Appropriations

    $50 million appropriated to the NEA:

      To be distributed in direct grants to fund arts projects and activities which preserve jobs in the non-profit arts sector threatened by declines in philanthropic and other support during the current economic downturn.

  1. Allocation of Funds

    The Act provides:

      That the amount set aside from this appropriation pursuant to section 1106 of this Act shall be not more than 5 percent instead of the percentage specified in such section.

    The NEA anticipates using approximately $500,000 of the funds for administrative and program support purposes such as costs associated with panels and travel, contractual support associated with our Information Technology operations, and staffing.

    After deducting administrative and program support costs, 60 percent of the remaining funds will be available for competitively selected grants to non-profit arts organizations and 40 percent available to be distributed to the State arts agencies and regional arts organizations ñ who, when subgranting, will distribute funds through competitive and qualitative reviews. For purposes of the Act, the funds made available to the State arts agencies and regional arts organizations are not considered to be formula funds.

    Specifically, the Act requires:

      Provided, That 40 percent of such funds shall be distributed to State arts agencies and regional arts organizations in a manner similar to the agencyís current practice and 60 percent of such funds shall be for competitively selected arts projects and activities according to sections 2 and 5(c) of the National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities Act of 1965 ...

  1. Use of Funds

    Consistent with the language in the Act, eligible projects will generally be limited to salary support and fees for artists or contracted personnel. This will apply to all applicants for support under the Act.

    The guideline language to be conveyed to applicants identifies the following eligible projects:

    • Salary support, full or partial, for one or more positions that are critical to an organization's artistic mission and that are in jeopardy or have been eliminated as a result of the current economic climate.
    • Fees for previously-engaged artists and/or contractual personnel to maintain or expand the period during which such persons would be engaged.

    For organizations eligible to subgrant, funds may also be used to cover the cost of implementing the subgranting program.

    When submitting their request, organizations may seek support for a single position, multiple positions, a single contractor, multiple contractual personnel, or any combination therein.

  1. Eligible Organizations

    In recognition of the funding level available, the importance of ensuring that recipients of funds are high-performing organizations (as noted in the Act implementation guidance provided by the Office of Management and Budget), the need to provide funding in a timely manner, and the capacity of the NEA and its staff, eligible organizations will be limited to those who previously received a grant from the NEA starting with fiscal year 2006 and through those approved for 2009 and considered at the NEAís October 2008 meeting of the National Council on the Arts. We estimate that 3,400 individual organizations will be eligible under this program, covering all the disciplines routinely supported by the NEA and every Congressional district.

    We should also point out that the NEA program established under the Act provides organizations with four avenues to seek support: directly from the NEA, or through a State arts agency, a regional arts organization, or a designated governmental local arts agency (see national coverage below). Thus, failing to be eligible to receive funds directly from the NEA does not preclude an organization from receiving funds through a subgrant awarded by a State arts agency, a regional arts organization, or a designated local arts agency.

  1. National Coverage

    To ensure the broadest possible reach, four avenues of support will be available to arts organizations. That is, organizations could apply directly to the NEA, or their State arts agency; their regional organization; or their designated governmental local arts agency.

  1. Number of Applications

    Organizations will be advised that they may receive funding under the Act from one source only; that is, they could get funds directly from the NEA, or through the State arts agency, or the regional arts organization, or their designated governmental local arts agency.

  1. Grant Amounts

    With the 60 percent available for competitive grants, organizations can apply for a grant of $25,000 or $50,000. For the designated governmental local arts agencies eligible to subgrant, requests of $100,000 or $250,000 are permitted provided the project involves subgranting.

    With the 40 percent available for State arts agencies and regional arts organizations, the amounts allocated to each will be determined using current processes as our guide, and will be based on equal shares (as stated in the NEAís authorizing legislation) and population. In making these determinations, the NEA will rely upon criteria used to make the fiscal year 2008 partnership awards to the States and regions ñ given that this is the most recent year for which a full appropriation exists.

    As a practical matter, each State arts agency under the Act will receive on average, 53 percent of their 2008 basic state plan allocation and each regional arts organization will receive 37 percent of their 2008 allocation.

  1. Matching Requirements

    Consistent with the Act, all NEA awards made with funds from the Act will be made on a non-matching basis; this includes those under the 60 percent and 40 percent processes.

  1. Award Process

    To implement the Act, the NEA intends to use processes consistent with those used to make awards under annual appropriations. More specifically, we intend to accomplish the following:

    • Develop and issue guidelines,
    • Rely upon Grants.gov for application submission,
    • Utilize panels of citizen experts to review applications,
    • Present recommended applications to the National Council on the Arts for their review and approval,
    • Receive final decisions from the NEA Chairman, or Acting Chairman, as applicable,
    • Develop any special award and reporting requirements consistent with the Act and OMB guidance,
    • Make awards,
    • Receive and review interim reports,
    • Make payments,
    • Receive and review final reports and closeout the grants.

    To the extent practical, the NEA will rely upon electronic processes to consider applications and make awards.

  1. Reporting Requirements

    The NEA awaits additional guidance from OMB concerning specific grant terms as well as reporting requirements. Current materials for applicants make clear that these will be made available once known and finalized. In the interim, we are making plans to accommodate the required periodic reporting from grantees and to the designated Web sites, including those required by the Congress.

  1. Timing

    This ambitious program requires an equally ambitious timeline in order to ensure that funds are available as soon as possible. For the 40 percent funds, the plan is to take applications to the March meeting of the National Council on the Arts for review and approval. For the 60 percent funds, the plan is to take applications to the June meeting of the National Council on the Arts.

    Meeting these timelines requires the issuance of NEA application guidelines in early March 2009.

  1. NEA Web site

    The NEA has already created the links required under the OMB guidance to implement the Act. This will ensure the availability of current information for applicants, grantees, and the American people.

  1. NEA Monitoring, Oversight and Reporting

    The NEA Acting Chairman has designated Robert Frankel, NEA Acting Deputy Chairman for Grants and Awards and Larry Baden, NEA Deputy Chairman for Management and Budget as the co-leads and designated agency officials for this program. In addition, the following has occurred:

    • An agency-wide matrix is nearing completion for tracking required actions necessary to implement the Act.
    • An intra-agency work group has been developed to assist with the application processing and grant award, monitoring and payment components of the program.
    • An agency-wide calendar is being developed for tracking required actions necessary to implement the Act.
    • A weekly meeting will be held with affected agency staff to review the status of planned actions.
    • A new position has been allocated to the NEA Office of Inspector General so that they may recruit for an employee who will focus on the NEA and grantee implementation of the Act.
  1. Status

    Our guidelines have been finalized and approved by OMB and were made available on Monday, March 2, 2009.

Overview

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, Public Law 111-5 ("Recovery Act") recognizes that the nonprofit arts industry is an important sector of the economy. In accordance with this Act, the National Endowment for the Arts has received funds to help preserve jobs in the nonprofit arts sector that are threatened by declines in philanthropic and other support during the current economic downturn. As partners of the Arts Endowment, the state arts agencies (SAAs) and regional arts organizations (RAOs) have an important role to play in advancing the goals of this program. The NEA will award American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds to the SAAs and RAOs specifically for projects that focus on the preservation of jobs in the arts.


Funds to the SAAs and RAOs must be used for subgranting to eligible nonprofit organizations in their state or region. These special, one-time subgrants to organizations must be used for:

  • Salary support, full or partial, for one or more positions that are critical to an organization's artistic mission and that are in jeopardy or have been eliminated as a result of the current economic climate.

And/or

  • Fees for previously engaged artists and/or contractual personnel to maintain or expand the period during which such persons would be engaged.

SAAs and RAOs may use up to $50,000 of the NEA grant funds for their own jobs for the purposes outlined above, and/or for the administration of the subgranting programs. Priority will be given to cost-effective programs that maximize the amount of funds distributed.


Each SAA and RAO must develop a plan to distribute these critical funds quickly. SAAs and RAOs are encouraged to use, as a template for their own material, the review criteria and application information that the NEA is using for its Recovery Act competitive grant program. (SAAs and RAOs that do not want to use the NEA material should advise the NEA.) The funds should directly impact a broad constituency that the SAA or RAO serves, and reach the full geographic range represented by that constituency. As appropriate, efforts should be made to reach organizations that serve underserved populations such as those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability.


Organizations are limited to receiving NEA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds through only one source . from the Arts Endowment directly, or directly through an entity eligible to subgrant NEA funds including a state arts agency, a regional arts organization of state arts agencies, or a designated local arts agency that is eligible to subgrant funds. To prevent overlaps in funding, the NEA will provide subgrantors with a list of organizations that receive American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds directly from the NEA (see .Period of Support. for more information).

National Science Foundation

Recent Update:

  • NSF is preparing a Current Plan to send to Congressional Appropriators as required by the Act.
  • NSF is working to ensure all stimulus funds are separate from non-Recovery Act funds in financial, grant writing, contract writing, and reporting systems.
  • NSF is proceeding with an expedited Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance number for a handful of new grant programs created by the act.
  • NSF is identifying opportunities to streamline data collection and help alleviate the reporting burden on recipients of Recovery Act funds.

Small Business Administration

Overview

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act will have a significant impact on small businesses and on the credit crunch, providing tax incentives and financing opportunities that will help them create jobs.


The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act makes SBA part of the solution, providing it with specific tools to make it easier and less expensive for small businesses to get loans, give lenders new incentives to make more small business loans, and help unfreeze the secondary markets to boost liquidity in the credit markets.


More details on implementation will be coming over the next few weeks.

The bill provides $730 million to SBA and makes changes to the agency's lending and investment programs so that they can reach more small businesses that need help. The funding includes:


  • $375 million for temporary fee reductions or eliminations on SBA loans and increased SBA guaranteed shares, up to 90 percent for certain loans
  • $255 million for a new loan program to help small businesses meet existing debt payments
  • $30 million for expanding SBA's Microloan program, enough to finance up to $50 million in new lending and $24 million in technical assistance grants to microlenders
  • $20 million for technology systems to streamline SBA's lending and oversight processes
  • $15 million for expanding SBA's Surety Bond Guarantee program
  • $25 million for staffing up to meet demands for new programs
  • $10 million for the Office of Inspector General

Veteran Affairs

Spending plans are being finalized. No other information yet available.

Transportation

Active Solicitations


Transportation is a great enabler of economic growth, the lifeblood of commerce. It moves people to jobs and goods to the marketplace. Without strong transportation arteries, economies stagnate. We will use the transportation funding in the Act to deliver jobs and restore our nation's economy. We will emphasize sustainable investment and focus our policies on the people, businesses and communities who use the transportation systems. And, we will focus on the quality of our environment. We will invest in jobs to expand transit capacity and modernize transit systems. We will invest in jobs to allow Amtrak to add and modernize cars and engines and upgrade its tracks. We will invest in jobs to expand airport capacity and make safety improvements. We will invest in jobs to build and rehabilitate and make safer roads, highways, bridges and ports. And we will invest in jobs to launch high-speed rail in America.

DOT Plans and Reports
The Recovery Act and related guidance include several provisions that require DOT to take steps beyond standard practice, including reporting, information collection, budget execution, risk management, and specific action related to award type.

DOT Reporting and Plans will include the following:

  • Major Communications
  • Formula Block Grant Allocation Reports
  • Weekly Updates . starting March 3rd; provides a breakdown of funding, major actions taken to date, and major planned actions
  • Monthly Financial Reports . starting May 8th; provides obligations, expenditures, and other financial data by Treasury Account, vendor, and award number, as well as information on allocations of mandatory and entitlement programs by State, county or other appropriate geographical unit
  • Agency Transaction Data Feeds . starting May 5th; provides all Recovery Act assistance transactions (primarily grants, loans, and loan guarantees)
  • Agency Recovery Plan . no later than May 1st; provides both broad recovery goals and the agency's coordinating efforts
  • Recovery Program Plans . no later than May 1st; provides a separate plan for each Recovery Act program named in the legislation